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WARDER'S COTTAGES (FMR), 7-41 HENDERSON STREET

Author

Heritage Council

Place Number

00877
There no heritage location found in the Google fusion table.

Location

7-41 Henderson St Fremantle

Location Details

Lot 2075 - House Numbers 7,9,11,13,15,17 Lot 2074 - House Numbers 19,21,23,25,27,29 Lot 2073 - House Numbers 31,33,35,37,39,41 (So Odd Number Houses from 7-41)

Other Name(s)

Accommodation for Enrolled Pensioner Force

Local Government

Fremantle

Region

Metropolitan

Construction Date

1851 to 1978

Demolition Year

N/A

Statutory Heritage Listings

Type Status Date Documents More information
Town Planning Scheme YES 08 Mar 2007 City of Fremantle
State Register Permanent 23 Nov 2001 Register Entry
Assessment Documentation

Other Heritage Listings and Surveys

Type Status Date Grading/Management More information
Category Description
Register of the National Estate Permanent 21 Mar 1978 NA

NA

Classified by the National Trust Recorded 11 Jun 1973 NA

NA

Municipal Inventory YES 18 Sep 2000 Level 1A

Level 1A

The City of Fremantle has identified this place as being of exceptional cultural heritage significance in its own right within the context of Fremantle. This place is entered onto the Heritage Council of Western Australia’s Register of Heritage Places. All development applications must be referred to the Heritage Council for approval.

City of Fremantle
Municipal Inventory YES 22 Feb 1992 Level 1A

Level 1A

The City of Fremantle has identified this place as being of exceptional cultural heritage significance in its own right within the context of Fremantle. This place is entered onto the Heritage Council of Western Australia’s Register of Heritage Places. All development applications must be referred to the Heritage Council for approval.

City of Fremantle

Condition

The oldest block (now referred to as W1) is located at 19-29 Henderson Street and was built in 1851. The second block (referred to as W2) is located at 31-41 Henderson Street and was built in 1852. The last remaining block (referred to as W3) is located at 7-17 Henderson Street and was built in 1858. BLOCK W1 Following the arrival of the first 75 convicts in 1850, the requirement for afordable accommodation for their warders and the Pensioner Guards became urgent. The warders had been enlisted in England under terms which guaranteed them quarters for themselves and their families or alternatively, an allowance for this purpose. The Comptroller General, Captain E Y Henderson, claimed it was too expensive to house the warders privately and started an urgent building programme. Block W1 was one of the initial three projects. The block consists of an attached group of six, two-storey dwellings. As built, adjacent dwellings are virtually a mirror image of each other. Consequently three dwellings are of similar plan and the other three are a mirror image of these. Although each dwelling was deisgned for one family, initially they were occupied by two. The original construction was of random rubble limestone walls, timber floors, timber stairs and a timber-shingled roof. There were two rooms each at ground and first floor levels. An attached walled yard at the rear enclosed a shed and a privy. Brick chimneys continued above the roof. The cramped accommodation is an example of working-class housing provisions of the time and reflects the low esteem in which warders were held in that period. Since 1851, various changes have occurred which have had minimal impact on the limestone fabric of the block. These changes have been concerned mainly with increasing the living space for the occupants and upgrading hygiene facilities. The yard at the rear was roofed fully to form a kitchen. Other alterations were made to outbuildings and fencing at the rear. At the front, a verandah was added in 1898. The front first floor windows gained awnings at some stage. The shingle roofing was replaced with corrugated iron in 1902 or 1904. The original shingles may have been replaced earlier. BLOCK W2 This block was built in 1852 to provide accommodation for 12 warders and their families. As with W1, each family was provided with two rooms. This block consists also of an attached group of six, two-storeyed dwellings with adjacent dwellings a mirror image of each other. The floor plan is fairly similar to the W1 block except that the direction of the stair flights has been reversed in W2. Other differences include the provision of one upper floor fireplace per dwelling (W2) compared with none (W1) and the deletion of the very small rear enclosed yard which, in the W1 houses, eventually became a kitchen. Two communal wash houses were provided at the rear of the block. The construction was simlar to W1 with random rubble limestone walls, timber floors, timber stairs and a timber-shingled roof. Brick chimneys continued above the roof. The front verandah addition is shown in 1898 records and a rear verandah in 1909. The block was re-roofed in iron in 1904. The upper floor front windows gained awnings at some time. In 1991 plans were drawn to convert the six attached houses into three by cutting doorways through party walls and by removing the stairs from three of the dwellings. The alterations that have occurred to W2 have not markedly affected the original structure of the block except for the conversion to three houses. BLOCK W3 Due to a continuing shortage of accommodation, a third block of warders' quarters was built in 1858. The two-storey block of six dwellings was originally designed to accommodate two families per dwelling. In this case, however, each family was to have three rooms. The upstairs family was to have their own entry, separated by partition walls from the downstairs family. In this block, the six dwellings were built to an identical plan. The construction again is of random rubble limestone with timber floors and stairs. Brick chimneys extended above roof level. W3 is distinguished by having a full length front verandah with first floor balcony. This is shown as a proposal on a drawing catalogued as September 1900. Other alterations have been concerned with improving the living conditions and hygienic arrangements. The original limestone fabric is essentially unchanged apart from the cutting of the first floor doorways to the balcony, when this was built, and the provision of pockets in the limestone to seat the balcony bearers.

Associations

Name Association Type Date From Date To
Imperial Convict Establishment Builder 18/09/2014 18/09/2014
James Manning, Clerk of Works Architect 18/09/2014 18/09/2014
Captain Henderson, Royal Engineer and Comptroller General of Convicts Architect 18/09/2014 18/09/2014

State Heritage Office library entries

ISBN Number Title Medium Year of Publication
A preliminary study of convict sites in Western Australia (draft). Heritage Study {Other} 1997
0646445685 Fremantle : beyond the Round House. Book 2005

Place Type

Individual Building or Group

Uses

Epoch General Specific
Original RESIDENTIAL Terrace housing
Original GOVERNMENTAL Other
Original RESIDENTIAL Conjoined residence
Present RESIDENTIAL Terrace housing

Architectural Styles

Style
Victorian Georgian

Construction Materials

Type General Specific
Wall STONE Limestone
Roof METAL Corrugated Iron

Historic Themes

General Specific
DEMOGRAPHIC SETTLEMENT & MOBILITY Workers {incl. Aboriginal, convict}
SOCIAL & CIVIC ACTIVITIES Law & order
PEOPLE Famous & infamous people
DEMOGRAPHIC SETTLEMENT & MOBILITY Immigration, emigration & refugees

Creation Date

30 May 1989

Publish place record online (inHerit):

Approved

Last Update

18 Sep 2014

Disclaimer

This information is provided voluntarily as a public service. The information provided is made available in good faith and is derived from sources believed to be reliable and accurate. However, the information is provided solely on the basis that readers will be responsible for making their own assessment of the matters discussed herein and are advised to verify all relevant representations, statements and information.