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Hamel Hall

Author

Shire of Waroona

Place Number

02692
There no heritage location found in the Google fusion table.

Location

Cornucopia St Hamel

Location Details

Local Government

Waroona

Region

Peel

Construction Date

Constructed from 1991, Constructed from 1900

Demolition Year

N/A

Statutory Heritage Listings

Type Status Date Documents More information
(no listings)

Other Heritage Listings and Surveys

Type Status Date Grading/Management More information
Category Description
Municipal Inventory Adopted 28 Nov 1995 Category 2

Category 2

Conservation Highly Recommended Of very considerable value to the Municipality. High level of protection appropriate; Provide maximum encouragement to the owner/s under the Town Planning Scheme to conserve the significance of the place; Encourage owner/s to reinstate and/or retain original fabric/features of the place (i.e. verandahs, shingles, timber windows) All development applications (including demolition) should be considered by Council Photographically record the place prior to any major development or demolition. Recommendations: Incorporate within Town Planning Scheme. Design guidelines/heritage policies should be developed in order to enhance and conserve the place in context with its location.

RHP - To be assessed Current 25 Nov 2005

Heritage Council

Statement of Significance

The hall has a high level of significance in its association with a penal settlement and the development of the district of Hamel, and through it s importance as a social and cultural venue for the local community even today.
Further research is required to determine whether the hall was the first penal institution in WA.

Physical Description

A six bay single room timber framed weatherboard cladding structure, with exposed timber footings, double hung sash windows and a gable corrugated iron roof. The original central front porch has been removed and replaced with double-doors off centre.
Around the inner walls can still be seen the small cupboards in which each prisoner kept his crockery etc.
A kitchen was added to the hall after 1991 by the restoration committee. None of the hall's original outbuildings are extant.

History

Hamel Hall was built c1900 to house the prisoners who were working on the roads, clearing land and planting pines for the Hamel Nursery. It is possibly the first penal institution established in WA (1902-1907).
The first lights were storm lanterns which was eventually replaced by an acetylene gas, and then a home lighting plant.
In 1908, the old prison was handed over to the trustees for use as an Agricultural Hall. In 1914, a piano was purchased. Around 1920, the hall, originally located in the Forestry Settlement was relocated to its present site.
At one time, the Hall was also used as the Post Office. In 1963, the last wedding reception was held.
By the mid 1970s, the hall was condemned as unsafe due to termites but was saved by the "Hamel Hall Restoration and Management Committee" which formed and secured money through fundraising and materials donated by local industries.
On 9th November 1991, the hall was reopened.

Place Type

Individual Building or Group

Uses

Epoch General Specific
Original Use FORESTRY Housing or Quarters
Other Use Transport\Communications Comms: Post or Telegraph Office
Present Use SOCIAL\RECREATIONAL Agricultural Hall

Architectural Styles

Style
Federation Carpenter Gothic

Construction Materials

Type General Specific
Wall TIMBER Weatherboard
Roof METAL Corrugated Iron

Historic Themes

General Specific
SOCIAL & CIVIC ACTIVITIES Sport, recreation & entertainment
DEMOGRAPHIC SETTLEMENT & MOBILITY Workers {incl. Aboriginal, convict}
TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATIONS Mail services

Creation Date

05 May 1989

Publish place record online (inHerit):

Approved

Last Update

01 Jan 2017

Disclaimer

This information is provided voluntarily as a public service. The information provided is made available in good faith and is derived from sources believed to be reliable and accurate. However, the information is provided solely on the basis that readers will be responsible for making their own assessment of the matters discussed herein and are advised to verify all relevant representations, statements and information.