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Mandurah Bridge

Author

City of Mandurah

Place Number

09083
There no heritage location found in the Google fusion table.

Location

Pinjarra Rd Mandurah

Location Details

Local Government

Mandurah

Region

Peel

Construction Date

Constructed from 1953, Constructed from 1952

Demolition Year

N/A

Statutory Heritage Listings

Type Status Date Documents More information
(no listings)

Other Heritage Listings and Surveys

Type Status Date Grading/Management More information
Category Description
Municipal Inventory Adopted 05 Aug 1997 Category 2

Category 2

Considerable local significance Of very considerable local significance. Owners should be assisted wherever possible to conserve the significance of the place, with particular reference to the town planning scheme. The site should be recorded photographically prior to development. Preparation of a conservation plan is desirable.

RHP - Does not warrant assessment Current 23 Feb 2007

Heritage Council

Statement of Significance

The bridge exists on a site historically significant for the development of Mandurah’s transportation and communication system, being the previous site of its ferry service and its first traffic bridge. The community lobbied hard to have the original bridge constructed, and then to have it replaced when it became derelict, so the new bridge symbolised a significant community achievement. The lower platform of the bridge is believed to attract more fishing enthusiasts and amateur anglers than any other similar fishing spot in Western Australia, making it a significant recreational place.

Physical Description

Constructed from jarrah, cement and steel.

History

This bridge replaced the previous (and first) bridge which was built across the neck of the Peel Inlet in 1894. The original bridge replaced the old and unreliable ferry service, which discontinued servicing the township in 1878.
The present bridge connects Pinjarra Road and Old Coast Road, Mandurah. It was constructed by the Main Roads Department and officially opened on 17 April 1953 by then Minister for Works, John Tonkin, and is characteristic of other notable bridges constructed around the same time such as Canning Bridge.
The bridge is 184 m long and 6.7 m wide, and the concrete piles used in construction are each 18.3 m long and weigh 10.10 tonnes. Two laneways (one for north and one for southbound traffic) exist for traffic, and a footway 2
metres wide for pedestrians and cyclists. Steps lead down from the footway to give access to the popular fishing platforms. The bridge was constructed with a vertical curve so clearance from the waterline to the span girders allowed for marine traffic.

Associations

Name Type Year From Year To
Public Works Department Architect - -

References

Ref ID No Ref Name Ref Source Ref Date
Ronald Richards "Mandurah and the Murray: a sequel to the history of the old Murray District of Western Australia" Shire of Murray and City of Mandurah 1993
Papers Mandurah Historical Society

State Heritage Office library entries

Library Id Title Medium Year Of Publication
9868 Old Mandurah Traffic Bridge, Mandurah Heritage Study {Other} 2011

Place Type

Historic site

Uses

Epoch General Specific
Present Use Transport\Communications Road: Bridge
Original Use Transport\Communications Road: Bridge

Construction Materials

Type General Specific
Other METAL Other Metal
Other TIMBER Other Timber
Other CONCRETE Other Concrete

Historic Themes

General Specific
TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATIONS Road transport
TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATIONS River & sea transport

Creation Date

18 Jul 1997

Publish place record online (inHerit):

Approved

Last Update

01 Jan 2017

Disclaimer

This information is provided voluntarily as a public service. The information provided is made available in good faith and is derived from sources believed to be reliable and accurate. However, the information is provided solely on the basis that readers will be responsible for making their own assessment of the matters discussed herein and are advised to verify all relevant representations, statements and information.