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Kalgan Hall (Upper)

Author

City of Albany

Place Number

00088
There no heritage location found in the Google fusion table.

Location

James St Kalgan

Location Details

approx 12 km North East of Albany on Hassell Highway, where Chelgiup Creek joins the Kalgan River (at the Upper Kalgan Bridge). MI States: Wheeldon Road

Local Government

Albany

Region

Great Southern

Construction Date

Constructed from 1912

Demolition Year

N/A

Statutory Heritage Listings

Type Status Date Documents More information
(no listings)

Heritage Council Decisions and Deliberations

Type Status Date Documents
(no listings)

Other Heritage Listings and Surveys

Type Status Date Grading/Management More information
Category Description
Municipal Inventory Adopted 30 Jun 2001 Category B

Category B

• Requires a high level of protection. • Provide maximum encouragement to the owner under the City of Albany Town Planning Scheme to conserve the significance of the place. • A more detailed Heritage Assessment/Impact Statement to be undertaken before approval given for any major redevelopment. • Incentives to promote heritage conservation should be considered.

Local Heritage Survey Adopted 27 Oct 2020 Some/moderate

Some/moderate

Contributes to the heritage of the locality.

Statement of Significance

[Taken from Conservation Plan, Howard and Heaver Architects, 2007 – pre 2014 works]
Kalgan Hall (upper), a single storey corrugated iron building with a gabled corrugated iron roof and skillion additions in the vernacular style, has cultural heritage significance for the following reasons:
The place is a rare surviving example in Western Australia of a corrugated iron, timber lined hall, and retention of the place of some of its original timber furnishings made by the local settlers is rare.
The place is believed to have accommodated a school for a longer period than any other community hall in Western Australia.
The place is believed to be a rare example of a hall remaining in use by the Association that built it in the pre-World War I period and continuing under their control into the twenty-first century.
The place is significant as a corrugated iron and timber hall, erected with a Grant in Aid in 1912, to provide a school and hall for the expanding community at Kalgan, used for Methodist church services from an early period, and later extended to provide a larger hall and improved facilities, which has been the community’s focal meeting place for more than 90 years.
The place is a good example of a simple vernacular style corrugated iron clad Federation period building with classically proportioned Georgian sash windows. The austerity of the original structure is softened by the early asymmetrical skillion accretions on the east and south walls that endow the building with a more organic aesthetic.
The place is a good representative example of a small vernacular style community hall in a regional area. It illustrates the lifestyle and strong sense of community spirit in isolated regional areas of Western Australia. It demonstrates the ability for self-help and improvisation to develop both physical and social infrastructure to build communities.
The place is a landmark in Kalgan. The dense and mature native vegetation on the perimeters of the site, including a number of mature Marri trees, creates a striking backdrop for the corrugated iron hall. The nearby Kalgan River with its granite waterfalls and pools and tall timber bridge, provide a wider setting of remarkable natural beauty.
Tthe pre-World War I, PWD, timber, earth closet building at the place is rare.
The new [1914/15] hall building continues the use of the site as a community hall and maintains some social and historic significance. The Aboriginal significance of the site maintains its significance.

Physical Description

Original Hall
Some of the notable features of this place include:
• Set over the river from the smaller Kalgan River Bridge in natural bushland
• Next door to the Fire Brigade Station
• Small scale, rectangular single storey hall
• Corrugated hipped iron roof and walls
• Some extensions done over time with skillion roofs
• Wooden framed windows

Some obvious modifications include:
• In 2014/15 the hall was substantially rebuilt and altered with new and recycled fabric.

History

The Kalgan Hall, built by the Kalgan Settlers’ Association, has been an important part of the Upper Kalgan community since its opening in 1912. The hall was built by Messrs Allwood and Wiley in seven days. When first opened the hall was used as a school and for Church services performed by travelling ministers. Dances and Ladies Social Club meetings also attracted people to the hall. In one end of the hall double bunks were provided so children could sleep while their parents danced.
A verandah was added in 1915, which was later enclosed in 1923 to provide additional hall space. At the same time a kitchen/servery was added and this was extended in 1943. In 1990 a separate new brick toilet block was built.
The Kalgan Hall site has been the subject of an archaeological investigation in the search for evidence of Aboriginal artefacts. During a 1987 study 180 archaeological sites were identified and six were excavated. Around the vicinity of the Kalgan hall site was one of the six and was found to have some of the oldest evidence of Aboriginal occupation in the district. An excavation in the grounds of the hall was performed reaching 2.5m in depth and showed continuous occupation from the early 1800’s (Around Mokare’s time) to before the lowest radiocarbon date of c18, 850. The hall is close to a ford in the Kalgan River which was a spot where many of the main Aboriginal tracks came together. As well as the ford 500m downstream are the Kalgan River Fishtraps (See Outer Place Record Form; Fishtraps – Kalgan River).
In 2014, the hall was dismantled and rebuilt using a mix of new and recycled fabric, and the Kitchen/Servery was substantially upgraded.

Integrity/Authenticity

Integrity: High
Authenticity: Moderate/Low

Condition

Good

References

Ref ID No Ref Name Ref Source Ref Date
"Oral History from Edith Webb,". Heritage TODAY and David Heaver Architects 1999
Wc Ferguson; "Australians to 1788: Mokare's Doimain". Ed DJ Mulveney and JP White.
Heritage TODAY Site visit and Assessment 1999

Place Type

Individual Building or Group

Uses

Epoch General Specific
Present Use SOCIAL\RECREATIONAL Other Community Hall\Centre
Original Use SOCIAL\RECREATIONAL Other Community Hall\Centre

Construction Materials

Type General Specific
Wall METAL Corrugated Iron
Roof METAL Corrugated Iron

Historic Themes

General Specific
SOCIAL & CIVIC ACTIVITIES Community services & utilities

Creation Date

29 Jun 1988

Publish place record online (inHerit):

Approved

Last Update

15 Jun 2022

Disclaimer

This information is provided voluntarily as a public service. The information provided is made available in good faith and is derived from sources believed to be reliable and accurate. However, the information is provided solely on the basis that readers will be responsible for making their own assessment of the matters discussed herein and are advised to verify all relevant representations, statements and information.