SOUTH MOLE LIGHTHOUSE

Author

City of Fremantle

Place Number

20647

Location

Fleet St Fremantle

Location Details

Local Government

Fremantle

Region

Metropolitan

Construction Date

Demolition Year

N/A

Statutory Heritage Listings

Type Status Date Documents
Heritage List YES 08 Mar 2007

Heritage Council Decisions and Deliberations

Type Status Date Documents
(no listings)

Other Heritage Listings and Surveys

Type Status Date Grading/Management
Category
Municipal Inventory Removed from MI 28 Sep 2011
Municipal Inventory Adopted 14 Oct 2000 Level 1A

Parent Place or Precinct

03602 Victoria Quay

Statement of Significance

Refer to the Heritage Council of Western Australia's Register of Heritage Places - Register and Assessment Documentation for 'Victoria Quay'. Victoria Quay, a landmark industrial urban landscape and townscape, comprising a wharf structure with berths, transit and work sheds, jetties and slipways, and associated South Mole and Inner Harbour, has cultural heritage significance for the following reasons: the place has national significance as the first landfall and entry point for tens of thousands of migrants to Australia; the place is representative of the development pattern of Australian harbours and has national significance as a mostly intact, industrial townscape that remains connected to a working port; the place, valued by special interest groups, the local community and wider public for its port and river related activities and cultural facilities, contributes to the identity of Fremantle; the establishment of the Harbour and associated facilities at Fremantle led to Fremantle's emergence over Albany as the State's premier port and facilitated economic growth through improved trade and communications for industry, commerce and agriculture; both individually and collectively, the buildings and structures on Victoria Quay display aesthetic characteristics and form groups of related buildings within the larger industrial precinct. The buildings and structures reflect the various phases of Western Australia's development from the late 1800s; the innovative wharf structure exhibits a high degree of engineering accomplishment and technical proficiency; the place has associations with a number of individuals and groups, including its designer, C. Y. O'Connor, its construction workforce, the Public Works Department and the maritime workers who have been employed at the place. Victoria Quay was the site of the 'Bloody Sunday' battle between police forces and waterside workers in May 1919; the place played a major role in Australia's defence operations during World War Two, with Australian, American, British and Dutch wartime service groups operating from the Quay. Many structures from this period remain ; the place is a major archaeological resource as the development of Victoria Quay necessitated reclamation works, rapid construction and subsequent recycling and replacement of buildings as the operational needs of the port developed; the place is valued by the general community as the main port, once the only port, connecting the mainland with Rottnest Island, a highly patronised and valued holiday destination; and, the place is a significant element in the wider precincts of the West End of Fremantle, Fremantle Harbour and the mouth of the Swan River. Victoria Quay is linked to these areas through visual, functional and historic associations. (extracted from the HCWA documentation for the place) The Lighthouse has historic significance for its associations with the development of the harbour and port of Fremantle. It has aesthetic significance for its landmark qualities. It has rarity value for being one of two identical cast iron lighthouses which were constructed and shipped out to Fremantle in 1903.

Physical Description

Refer to the Heritage Council of Western Australia's Register of Heritage Places - Register and Assessment Documentation for 'Victoria Quay'. A circular building of cast iron, approximately 18m in height, made in sections. Sectional construction on concrete base. Entrance to the lighthouse is ornamented by a simple pediment and the door has paneled detailing, reminiscent of domestic style architecture. The windows and window panels are also ornamented with a similar pediment, adding a decorative touch to an otherwise austere building.

History

Refer to the Heritage Council of Western Australia's Register of Heritage Places - Register and Assessment Documentation for 'Victoria Quay'. Victoria Quay is a landmark industrial urban landscape and townscape between the Fremantle Harbour and the West End Conservation Area comprising a wharf structure with berths, transit and work sheds, jetties and slipways, and associated South Mole and Inner Harbour. The place has national significance as the first landfall and entry point for tens of thousands of migrants to Australia. It is rare as a mostly intact surviving late 19th century port, linked to a similarly intact 19th century West End Conservation Area, which together represent heritage of an international gold exploitation venture. One of two cast iron lighthouses which were constructed and shipped out to Fremantle in 1903. Due to the confusion caused by an additional occulting white lighthouse to Woodman's Point light, it was decided that the South Mole lighthouse would emit a fixed green light. Historical accounts state that the second lighthouse was handed over to the government for installation at Gantheaume Point, Broome. However, the lighthouse erected on the North Mole is identical to that installed on the South Mole, suggesting that the second lighthouse was finally erected in its originally intended location. This place was included in the "North Fremantle Heritage Study", prepared by Craig Burton, for the City of Fremantle, June 1994.

Integrity/Authenticity

Substantially intact.

Condition

Condition assessed as good (assessed from streetscape survey only).

Other Keywords

The Fremantle MHI management category for this place was amended and adopted by the decision of Council on 28/09/2011 - Level 1A as part of Registered Place 'Victoria Quay.'
This Place Record was removed from the MHI as an individual place on 28/09/2011.

Place Type

Individual Building or Group

Uses

Epoch General Specific
Present Use Transport\Communications Water: Lighthouse
Original Use Transport\Communications Water: Lighthouse

Construction Materials

Type General Specific
Roof METAL Cast Iron
Wall METAL Cast Iron
Wall GLASS Glass

Historic Themes

General Specific
OCCUPATIONS Fishing & other maritime industry

Creation Date

20 Jul 2011

Publish place record online (inHerit):

Approved

Last Update

22 Mar 2019

Disclaimer

This information is provided voluntarily as a public service. The information provided is made available in good faith and is derived from sources believed to be reliable and accurate. However, the information is provided solely on the basis that readers will be responsible for making their own assessment of the matters discussed herein and are advised to verify all relevant representations, statements and information.